A Few Key Points About GSK’s Priorix Vaccine

Merck’s MMR vaccine has been against the ropes for some time, with critics cautioning against possible contribution of the vaccine to autism, whistleblowers alleging Merck spiked rabbit antibodies into samples to defraud the FDA, and studies showing waning vaccine efficacy and lack of boosting power. GSK’s Priorix is about to be adopted for use in the US, and there are a few points to keep in mind, using information from the scientific literature and a Canadian PRODUCT MONOGRAPH:

Priorix targets a different type of measles than the MMR. GSK’s vaccine targets the Schwarz strain, while the MMR targets the Edmonston-Zagreb measles strain. A study in Bangladesh in 1987 showed that vaccination against the Schwarz strain led to half the seroconversion rate (35%) as the E-Z strain (62%).

 

(3) The side effects can be serious.

From the Canadian Monograph:

“Page 21 of 23
INTERACTIONS WITH THIS VACCINE
In subjects who have received immune globulins or a blood transfusion, vaccination should be delayed for at least three
months.

If a tuberculin test (skin test to check for tuberculosis) is to be performed, it should be done either before, at the same time as, or 4 to 6 weeks aftervaccination with PRIORIX, otherwise the result of the tuberculin test may not be correct.

Your doctor may decide to give PRIORIX at the same time as other vaccines. A different injection site will be used for each vaccine.”

[JLW: Your doctor may decide? This ia presumptive consent, not informed consent.]

“PROPER USE OF THIS VACCINE
In case of drug overdose, contact a health care practitioner, hospital emergency department or regional Poison Control Centre (Oh, Canada!) immediately, even if there are no symptoms.

The vaccine must be administered by a health professional.

A single 0.5 mL dose of the reconstituted vaccine is recommended.

Usual dose:

PRIORIX will be injected under the skin or into a muscle either in the upper arm or in the outer thigh.

PRIORIX should not be administered intravascularly (into a blood vessel).
Different injectable vaccines should always be administered at different injection sites.”

It is not likely to be “either MMR or PRIORIX”. It will likely to offered in addition to, and doctors will be performing new experiments on patients with untested combined use in an untested schedule.

“PRIORIX may be given as a booster dose in subjects who have previously been vaccinated with another measles, mumps and rubella combined vaccine.”

ACIP has never taken a vaccine type off the schedule, no matter how old the vaccine formula is. They have changed recommendations for one age group for the HPV vaccine, dropping the third dose for teens and younger adults.  According to the American Cancer Society, the reason is parent/teen conflict – not HPV vaccine injury:

From the ACS website:

Debbie Saslow, PhD, senior director, HPV Related and Women’s Cancers at the American Cancer Society, said the new recommendation will make it easier for people to get protection from HPV. “It’s a burden on parents to get teenagers to the provider’s office. The new recommendations not only cut down on repeated trips, but also spread out the recommended interval. This adds the flexibility that allows the second shot to be given at a time when the child will already be at the provider’s office for something else – an annual checkup, a sports physical, or even something like a strep test.”

That’s a load of baloney to represent this is parent/teen strife.  Many of the teens won’t go back because the second dose made them intolerably ill.  It’s family/doctor strife that’s the problem – the doctors will not attribute vaccine injuries to vaccines. Nope, never vaccine injury.  Can’t say that in the US.

If Priorix and Merck’s MMR are both given to patients each according to their own schedule, it would double the number of measles, mumps and rubella live attenuated virus vaccines exposures.   CDC says that a second MMR vaccine, usually given at 4 years of age, “can be given early”, as long as it is has been 28 days since the last MMR.

I wonder if 4, therefore doses of a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine is in the works for children and teens without evidence of immunity?

Given that this studythis studythis study shows 24% efficacy of the MMR against mumps 20 years after vaccination, lifetime immunity is clearly not available via vaccination.

Merck also has the MMRV vaccine, which, in addition to measles, mumps and rubella contains the varicella-zoster virus, which causes Chickenpox and Shingles.

 

 

Original source: https://jameslyonsweiler.com/2019/06/27/a-few-key-points-about-gsks-priorix-vaccine/

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